Franklinton

Franklinton
Franklinton

Bordered by the Scioto River, Greenlawn Avenue and I-70, Franklinton’s redevelopment has been an inspired, community effort rooted in the spirit of independence and art as life.

Established in 1797, much of Franklinton, affectionately known as “The Bottoms,” was built on land that lied below the river level, causing immense flooding and economic hardship in its early days. After the construction of a flood wall, however, people flocked back to the historical community and have spent the better part of the decade creating an arts community that rivals larger urban cities. And that’s no better exemplified that in Franklinton’s 400 West Rich building.

This crafty warehouse offers everything from studio space to Farmer’s Markets and is the perfect locale to experience the gritty, beautiful arts atmosphere of Columbus. Enjoy craft beers at Land-Grant Brewery or Brew Dog, order a burger at Strongwater Food and Spirits, or stroll to Franklinton Gardens. Bike enthusiasts (both kinds) can visit A.D. Farrow Harley-Davidson or Franklinton Cycle Works. Family fun can be had on the neighborhood’s east side at COSI Science Center.

But the real highlight of Franklinton is the Columbus Idea Foundry. This 60,000 square-foot building houses community workshops, coworking facilities, and abundant creative space for everything creative and then some. Its purpose is to bring talent, tools, and resources to one shared community and build the Columbus arts community from its grassroots of artists, artisans, techies, and entrepreneurs. In fact, this comradery has inspired noteworthy neighborhood events include Urban Scrawl, Go West, and the Tour of Franklinton Bike Race.

Diverse, growing, and with a great view, living and working in Franklinton gives the benefit of close proximity to Downtown while being in a separate, unique neighborhood.

[Header photo by LaJuana Taylor / CityPulse Columbus. The mural, by Jeremy Jarvis, was created for the Boys & Girls Club of Columbus over a period of one week with 100 volunteers from the Harmony Project utilizing a paint-by-number style of artistry.]

EXPLORE FRANKLINTON

Comments are closed.